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Duckweed Seen as Alternative Protein in Aquaculture World

October 7, 2015

Am delighted that International Aquaculture Magazine is running a very nice article on duckweed as a strong potential feedstock for fisheries. Thanks to Peter Parker of Perindale Publishing for discovering duckweed and running with the story.

Photo credits: Janice Parker of Mayfield, KY. She is terrific!
I have not been posting as much as I used to as I have gotten very involved in commercial duckweed production and my days just zoom by. I just looked at the stats on this site and found that  it garnered over 500 hits on Sept. 24th. Can’t quite figure out why but am happy at the surge in interest in duckweed. Something about Pinterest uploads…

Duckweed as Alternative Protein Source Interview

September 2, 2015

I was recently interviewed by Peter Parker of Perendale Publishers of England for their Milling and Grain Magazine. The e-version just came out, with the printed version to follow. It turned out very good. Nice job and thank you, Peter!

Duckweed Jam Instead of Farm Tour This Year

August 24, 2015

greensun logo smallFor two years running, my startup company, GreenSun Products has hosted a duckweed farm tour. This year I want to change it up and have a Duckweed Jam  for my besties at my home instead. Bring your guitars, a folding chair, and favorite beverage. I’ll supply the duckweed vodka and whiskey and some duckweed jerk chicken. We’ll hang out on my massive deck (If I do say so, myself..) and jam to rock, country, reggae, and blues by the light of the silvery moon. If you don’t play an instrument, no problem. We need professional listeners. If you want to soak in the hot tub, that is cool. Swimming trunks are optional. If you want to camp, I have space for several tents. As always, free duckweed samples for those who want to get their own growing.

You know you are a bestie if you are reading this, can make it to Western KY on Saturday, September 26, and are one of the first 100 people to RSVP.

Life is short. Good times are shorter.

Cheers,
Tamra

Torturing Duckweed

August 10, 2015

Let’s facduckweed in glass containere it. as much as I love duckweed, I can be very cruel to it as well. I have no problem with putting it through the wringer in an effort to understand its absolute limits in small to medium  outdoor settings. For example, I am currently gazing out at a glass casserole dish sitting on my deck. The container’s surface has a plucky layer of duckweed that currently is a nice shade of green and actually growing nicely. The torture part? It has been 95 degrees F every day for weeks and this lemna is sitting in one inch of water. It is every bit as hot as the air surrounding it. (if not hotter due to the reflection of the glass.) Pure torture. Am impressed.

Be nice to your duckweed in urban gardening settings. Don’t treat it the way I treat mine. Give it several inches of water and keep small containers in partial shade.

I Built a Mega Outdoor Living Space and I Mean MEGA

May 31, 2015

Imagine ignoring conventional wisdom and simply going ahead and building a mega deck. I recently built 900 square feet of deck space around the perimeter of  half my home and absolutely love it. I lost twenty pounds and built some solid muscle in the process. It has been one of my dreams for the past five years to have an attached deck. Not just any deck but one that is truly a living space. Cook, eat, nap, entertain, watch wildlife, commune with nature, and have lots of extra space to spread out with power tools so I can build big stuff that I can’t build indoors. Oh, and finally get a hot tub.

I took the plunge and ordered that hot tub a few weeks ago and then had to burn the midnight oil in building that dream deck by the time the hot tub arrived. My son, Thomas, worked beside me every step of the way. Love that sudden adult relationship with a twenty year old son. It made the project so much fun and boy, we got it done a lot quicker that I could have on my own. We beefed up the hot tub area of the deck with extra supports. It all came out pretty level, thanks to renting a laser transit on Day One. I highly, highly recommend doing that, especially with a deck that wraps around a home in all sorts of configurations.

My new hot tub arrived from Fitness Leisure out of St. Petersburg, Florida. It’s a five seater- not super fancy like those crazy amazing floor models you see in a retail spa outlet, but well-built, wonderful and perfect just the same. We rolled it onto the deck using garbage can dollies and I spent two hard days converting the wiring from 110 to 220 volts by installing a GFCI breaker box and then wiring to the main breaker box. (That heavy wire was a BEAR!!! to wire up.)

0527150824a Last night I climbed in the hot tub for the first time.Hummingbirds darted back and forth, the moon peeped through the clouds, and the frogs were in full chorus. I deemed it worth every cent and sore muscle to be able to sit in a hot tub on my own private elevated living space, high above the sloping ground, poison ivy and ticks, and with full view of a beautiful mini-forest.0531150806a

I learned a few lessons from all this.

1. Even when the going gets so tough you want to bawl, KEEP ON GOING!  It’ll be worth it in the end.

2. When everyone tells you 900 square feet of deck is too much, tell them it isn’t enough but its all you can afford.

3. Use building codes like your best friend. Seriously. I am love with building codes.

4. If you wire up a hot tub on your own,  get an electrician to at least follow up and insure you did it right. (Note: I DID wire it up correctly but my connections needed to be tighter.)

5. Be creative like crazy- you don’t get too many opportunities like this in one lifetime.

Today, I am going to savor and rest. We threw a graduation party last night for my seventh son and the hot tub was a big hit. I crashed at 11pm but the party went on until 3AM according to my very sleepy sons this morning.

I have lots to still do, like install a permanent railing of steel cable, three sets of stairs, and finish a pergola.  Then on to designing some cool deck furniture. Can’t go around sitting on five gallon buckets with a folded towel on top forever. Actually, if I modded them…. Hmmm…..

Medical report:  I go in for surgery this week to correct a major hearing loss in one ear. I cannot lift or sneeze or anything for a month. This wreaks havoc with my building projects, not to mention duckweed harvesting but it will be worth it. My world has become more and more silent. I am lucky to be able to hear the loudest of birds outdoors. I can only imagine what the world will sound like once I recover from this surgery. Wish me luck!

Latest ISCDRA Duckweed Newsletter Now Available

April 9, 2015

While some of you may be scratching your heads at why I would include a link to this particular newsletter- (After all, don’t you have enough to read without wading through fifty pages of science and news stories about duckweed???) this is one newsletter that means a whole lot to me.  I have been on a team developing it from the ground up, two years ago. My contributions have included interviewing duckweed movers and shakers, writing articles, and being part of an editing team led by the world’s foremost duckweed researcher, Dr. Klaus Appenroth. Also on the active role as team member- Eduardo Mercovitch from MamaGrande in Argentina.

I’ve learned a whole lot about what it takes to develop an early-stage scientific journal. Yes, sometimes our team pulls their hair out over deadlines, etc… but it has been a labor of great love and greater purpose- chronicling the development of what promises to be one of the top sustainable solutions to global food and water shortages. It’s been truly an honor. Hope you readers enjoy the articles and catch the excitement/struggles/awe that all captivated by duckweed experience every day.

Here’s the link to the newsletter.

Special note to Klaus and Eduardo- Can hardly wait to see you both at the Kyoto conference July 3-6 of this year. We will have to have a special toast to pulling together this unique newsletter eight times thus far.  It has truly been an honor to work with you both.

As for everyone reading this, the third  International Conference on Duckweed Research and Applications is officially open for call for papers and general registration. If you are a duckweed researcher or interested in networking business opportunities in duckweed- this is YOUR event. Right now we cannot grow enough and won’t be able to for thirty years- the demand is that great.

Free Webinar on Duckweed for Fish and Poultry Farming

April 4, 2015
Attention:  Fish and Poultry Farmers,
Love saving money on feed costs and raising healthier fish and poultry? We do too and that is why we LOVE duckweed.
If you’ve ever wondered the following:
– What’s all the fuss about duckweed anyway?
– How to wild harvest duckweed for feeding to chickens or tilapia
– How to raise tilapia and duckweed in a win/win integrated system
– How to raise duckweed in a small pond using animal waste
– How much duckweed should be fed to fish or poultry?
We’ve assembled a panel of hands-on experts to describe the “How To’s” and answer your questions.

David Beebe of Cherry Ridge Organic Farm, Middlebrook, VA. David raises tilapia and uses duckweed to “mine” the resulting waste nutrients from his fish tanks. He then returns those nutrients back as fresh feed for his tilapia, reducing his feeds costs by a large percentage

Ken Carman, naturalist and manager of Roxbury Park, Meggett, SC.    Ken has wild-harvested hundreds of tons of free duckweed for feeding to chickens and as mulch for his park. He’ll talk about his methods for duckweed harvesting and how his poultry have responded since adding fresh duckweed to their diets.

Meet Dr. Louis Landesman, “Dr. Duckweed” who is known around the world for his expertise on integrated farming systems that include duckweed. He will explain how to design your own integrated system that reuses nutrients and water over and over with the engine power of the sun.

It’s going to be an information-packed hour!  Have questions for the panel to incorporate into their presentations? Email them  to Tamra Fakhoorian, host, ahead of time.  tamraf9@gmail.com  There will be a dedicated Q and A session during the webinar as well.
 ILA Webinar:   Tuesday, April 7th,  2015  Noon Eastern  (New York time zone)   
For our international friends, try this time zone converter for easily calculating event time:  http://www.thetimezoneconverter.com/


Note: This meeting will be recorded.  Participation limited to the first 20 responders.   RSVP to meeting host, tamraf9@gmail.com
 
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